How would an aircraft fly with an inoperative aircraft radio transmitter while approaching an airport? - اسأل الطيار ask pilot

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الأحد، 12 يوليو 2020

How would an aircraft fly with an inoperative aircraft radio transmitter while approaching an airport?


How would an aircraft fly with an inoperative aircraft radio transmitter while approaching an airport. The following is correct regarding light signals from the tower.
It is important to remember that it is often difficult to diagnose radio malfunction during flight. Therefore it is hard to know whether you have a malfunctioning transmitter, a malfunctioning receiver, or perhaps both. You also have the point-of-failure that is the headset you are using. For this reason it is quite usual to carry a spare headset and the first piece of diagnostics is to swap headsets. Many General aviation aircraft also have a handheld microphone and speakers integrated into the radio stack.
**Receiver Inoperative
1) Remain outside class D airspace until the direction of air traffic can be ascertained.
2) Notify the tower your type, position, altitude, intention to land and request you are controlled with light signals.
3) At 3 -5 miles, advise the tower of your position and join the traffic pattern.
4) Watch the tower for light signals
5) Continue to advise of position (downwind, turning base, etc)
**Transmitter inoperative
1) Remain outside class D airspace until the direction of air traffic can be ascertained.
2) Monitor the primary local control frequency as depicted on sectional charts for landing or traffic info.
3) Look out for light signals that may be directed to your aircraft
4) During hours of daylight, acknowledge tower transmissions or light signals by rocking your wings
5) At night, acknowledge by blinking landing of navigation lights
**Transmitter & Receiver inoperative
1) Remain outside class D airspace until the direction of air traffic can be ascertained
2) Maintain visual contact with the tower and acknowledge light signals as above.
3) The light signals used for an aircraft in flight are as follows source:
Steady green - Cleared to land
Flashing green - Cleared to approach airport, or return to land
Steady red - Continue circling, give way to other aircraft
Flashing red - Airport unsafe, do not land
Alternating red and green - Exercise extreme caution
**Note
First thing you do when the radio breaks down is to start squawking 7600 (the code for radio malfunction) on your transponder.
Then when you approach the airport they will attempt to contact you first through radio (to see if you can still hear them) and you use alternate means of replying (sending IDENT on transponder, rocking your wings,...).
If you can't hear them they will use a light gun to convey messages.
Flashing red means airport unsafe—do not land. Flashing green indicates that the pilots should return to airport for landing, but needs to wait for steady green to be cleared to land. Alternating red and green is a general warning signal and that the pilot should exercise extreme caution.
A solid green light means you’re cleared to land, and you may only land after receiving this signal. Acknowledge this signal at night by flashing your landing light. A steady red light means you must give way to other aircraft in the pattern. Continue to circle and wait for a steady green light.
After landing, continue to look for light signals – you’re looking for either a flashing red (taxi clear of runway) and or flashing green (cleared to taxi). The tower will most likely freeze ground traffic until they determine where you’re headed.
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